The Family Informed Trauma Treatment (FITT) Model

The FITT Model recognizes and aims to address the impact of traumatic events and contextual stressors on every member of the family, on family relationships, and on the family as a whole. The FITT Model, anchored in family and trauma-informed principles and practices, provides the framework for an ecological family systems approach that strengthens families’ efforts to attain safety and stability as they plot a course to address their unique needs. Recognizing that families interact with mental health care services at various stages of readiness, the FITT model infuses a trauma-specific family systems approach to assessment, intervention and treatment planning to aid families in accessing to family and trauma-informed treatment.

Click on any section of the family system below  to learn more about how trauma impacts each level of the family system as well as available assessments and interventions for individual family members, family relationships and the family as a whole.

 

Key for Model

1 In the model, the solid lines represent the effects of exposure to chronic trauma directly on individual family members. Individual family members form dyadic subsystems such as adult intimate partnerships, parent-child, and sibling relationships. The dotted lines represent the multiple pathways among chronic trauma and dyadic family subsystems. The dashedlines represent the pathways through which chronic trauma influences family processes and the bold, dashed line a direct causal relationship.

The FITT Model recognizes and aims to address the impact of traumatic events and contextual stressors on every member of the family, on family relationships, and on the family as awhole. The FITT Model, anchored in family and trauma-informed principles and practices, provides the framework for an ecological family systems approach that strengthens families’ efforts to attain safety and stability as they plot a course to address their unique needs. Recognizing that families interact with mental health care services at various stages of readiness, the FITT model infuses atrauma-specific family systems approach to assessment, intervention and treatment planning to aid families in accessing to family and trauma-informed treatment. Click on any section ofthe family system to learn more about how trauma impacts each level of the family system as well as available assessments and interventions for individual family members, family relationships and the family as a whole.

References: Kaysen, D., Resick, P. A., & Wise, D. (2003). Living in danger: the impact of chronic traumatization and the traumatic context on post traumatic stress disorder. Trauma Violence & Abuse, 4(3), 247-264.
Kiser, L. J. (2006). Protecting children from the dangers of urban poverty. Clinical Psychology Review, 27(2), 211-225.
Kiser, L. J., & Black, M. A. (2005). Family processes in the midst of urbanpoverty. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 10(6), 715-750.

For further reference please see: Family processes in the midst of urban poverty: What does the traumaliterature tell us?

 

 

 

 

 

TRAUMATIC CONTEXT CHILD RESPONSE SIBLING RELATIONS FAMILY PROCESSES PARENT CHILD RELATIONS ADULT PARENTAL RESPONSE INTERGENERATIONAL RESPONSE PARENTING PRACTICES & QUALITY ADULT INTIMATE RELATIONS Trauma-Informed Principles and Family Informed Practices